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Summer Edition 2018

I remember an elder telling me that it was so hot there was nothing to do but sit and read. As a booklover, I appreciate the sentiment, but I also love the events, sounds, and sites of Wisconsin’s warmest months. Fortunately for all of us, the reviewers at ylvoice enjoy being out and about too. This season, like all others, they’ll be busy.

From summer blockbusters to family events, we at ylvoice will share our thoughts and reflections on the season. We have some great writers in our fold, and more and more events are reaching out to us to ask if we’ll check out the exciting work they’re producing. We’re happy to oblige, and we’re thrilled that you’ve all come to trust our voice on matters relating to Wisconsin’s Native arts and culture.

If you’re visiting our site for the first time due to seeing our work published in periodicals throughout the state, I’m happy to recognize that our reach has inspired you to see what we’re about. I invite you to click around, check out our back catalog, and, if you feel so inclined, submit some of your own work to us. We’d love to read what you’re writing, and chances are that some others throughout the Badger State will too. We can never have too many voices for our journal, and the next writer whose words we amplify might as well be yours.

We want our journal to be a meeting place for dialogues concerning Native Arts and Culture. We’re excited to be in the midst of summer with you, and hope that you’re enjoying the season, the powwow trail, the films, theater, and all other tastes and sounds from throughout our great state.

There’s never “nothing to do” in Wisconsin’s Native communities, but if you’d like to sit a read a book or take in a film then we’re happy to recommend a few.

In addition to being the acting editor of ylvoice, Ryan Winn writes a monthly column for the Tribal College Journal.Winn also teaches English, Theater, and Communication at College of Menominee Nation, where he has been recognized as the American Indian College Fund’s Faculty Member of the Year.

Spring Edition 2018

by Ryan Winn

Spring is a season of potential.  The snow is melting, the rain is rejuvenating, and soon the buds will be sprouting.  It’s in these months that past writers have found the inspiration to label spring’s months both the “the cruelest” and a time when “nothing gold can stay.”  Though not exactly uplifting on the surface, these words endure because they capture the magic that nature gives us as it’s reborn anew.

We at ylvoice.com hope that this spring inspires you to create and appreciate the art that makes the world a richer place to inhabit.  Draw in that breath of fresh air and resolve to give back to the world we all enjoy.   And, of course, if you have a piece you’d like to submit or a work of art you think we should write about, please contact me at rwinn@menominee.edu. As editor of our journal, I look forward to both hearing from you and using your input to make our contributions to Wisconsin’s art community even stronger.

I can assure you that we will continue to review the film, books, and music you should consider spending some time with.  If you haven’t noticed, we’ve added a few new voices to the fold.  This means our monthly offerings have never been greater, and we hope that you will explore all that our site has to offer.  You will not be disappointed.

As spring comes to us all, we want to thank you for spending some time with us.  We’re thrilled to be Wisconsin’s go-to voice for Native arts and culture, and we hope that going forward, you’ll help us spread the word about the great work we’re cultivating. 

In addition to being the acting editor of ylvoice, Ryan Winn writes a monthly column for the Tribal College Journal.  Winn also teaches English, Theater, and Communication at College of Menominee Nation, where he has been recognized as the American Indian College Fund’s Faculty Member of the Year.

 

Winter Edition 2017

by Ryan Winn

A new year is upon us and with it comes changes for ylvoice.com. We’re thrilled to announce that in 2018 we will be expanding our reach to share our work directly with tribal newspapers in Northeastern Wisconsin. Our hope is that we can both expand the impact of our writers’ voices and inspire new writers to submit to our journal.

We’re also going to continue to expand our critical scope to include reviews of non-Native media. We’ll still be the go-to place for commentary on Native films, books, and events, but we want to encourage our contributors to engage with the work of artists from throughout our multicultural world. Moreover, it’s interesting to ponder their thoughts on everything from mainstream music to popular television shows.

We will also be hosting some new writing workshops that we hope our readers will partake in. Our mission is to help Wisconsin’s Native writers both find and hone their voices, and our previous workshops have been instrumental in helping writers make the leap from writing for oneself to writing for publication.

As always, if you have a piece you’d like to submit or a work of art you think we should write about, please contact me at rwinn@menominee.edu. As editor of our journal, I look forward to both hearing from you and using your input to make our contributions to Wisconsin’s art community even stronger.

Winter is the time for traditional Native storytelling, and with the expansion of ylvoice.com’s reach, there has never been a better time for the Badger State’s Native writers to take to their keyboards. We hope you, our loyal readers, will be amongst the ranks of writers whose work we publish in 2018.

In addition to being the acting editor of ylvoice, Ryan Winn writes a monthly column for the Tribal College Journal. Winn also teaches English, Theater, and Communication at College of Menominee Nation, where he has been recognized as the American Indian College Fund’s Faculty Member of the Year.

 

Fall Edition 2017

by Ryan Winn

Fall is my favorite season. I love the crispness in the air as my family and I walk through a pumpkin patch, grab some apples from an orchard, and harvest the last of the vegetables from our garden. I’m also a runner who loves the cool bite in my lungs as I enjoy some late season events. Yes, fall is truly a great time to live in Wisconsin. The colors are never brighter and the scenery is refreshing.

As always, we at ylvoice are excited share our bounty with you. We have some astute thoughts on local events, thoughtful commentary on the latest media, and a few stories that we hope to inspire you with. Our journal is a hub for the latest writing from Native voices throughout the Badger state, and we want to thank you for both reading our words and sharing them with others.

As we enter another year, our aim is to continue to grow in the writers we feature and the readers we engage. We hope that if you’re debating sending in your work that this is the season you decide to final do it. We’d love to help you find both your platform and your audience.

Moreover, if there’s an event or media item you’d like us to review, please send me an email at rwinn@menominee.edu. We’re always looking for the next great story. The same is true of holding a writer’s workshop. I’d love to visit any tribal communities that are able to host me. Although attending a workshop is not required for publishing on our site, four out of every five writers we feature has benefited from one or more or our workshops.

This is truly a great time of year for writing, publishing, and, well, just being alive. Embrace it, enjoy it, and contribute to it. Thanks for reading!

In addition to being the acting editor of ylvoice, Ryan Winn writes a monthly column for the Tribal College Journal. Winn also teaches English, Theater, and Communication at College of Menominee Nation, where he has been recognized as the American Indian College Fund’s Faculty Member of the Year.

Summer Edition 2017

by Ryan Winn

I’ve always found summer’s scenery to be inspiring.  A visit to a lake, a stroll through a nature trail, and a beautiful sunset all seem to refresh the spirit and showcase what Wisconsin has to offer us.  I also love Fourth of July festivities, the start to powwow season, and summer movie fanfare.  Needless to say, the theater enthusiast in me really loves the magic of summer productions.  

This summer we at ylvoice are happy to bring you Native peoples’ writing that captures the spirit of this amazing season.  We’ll tell you our thoughts about art shows, theatre productions, powwows, and, as always, point out a few films and books you should check out.  You can count on us to be open and honest about what we think, and we hope that you and yours continue to count on us as a place to celebrate writing and art from the Badger state.   

Now more than ever, we at ylvoice are looking for new works by Wisconsin’s First Nations’ citizens.  If you or someone you know is interested in submitting, then please send us a note.  Our strength is in amplifying voices.  We hope that someday soon we’ll be able to amplify more.

Wisconsin is a wonderful place to spend the summer.  We’re happy to live in this inspiring state that has so many strong Native Nations within its borders.  We recommend that you take the time and see what each Nation’s tourism has to offer you.  Taking a summer road trip, no matter how short, is always a memorable experience.  Take your laptop with you, or at the very least your smart phone, and use the apps to capture some of your thoughts or to snap a few great photos.  Be inspired, and then head on over to our site to check in with us.  Become one of the people who continually celebrate what other Wisconsin artists are posting for all to see. 

In addition to being the acting editor of ylvoice, Ryan Winn writes a monthly column for the Tribal College Journal.  Winn also teaches English, Theater, and Communication at College of Menominee Nation, where he has been recognized as the American Indian College Fund’s Faculty Member of the Year.

Spring Edition 2017

By Ryan Winn

Spring reminds me of poetry. I credit T.S. Elliot and his famous opening to “The Wasteland”—April is the cruelest month. Elliot’s meaning is that the things that have lain dormant in the winter are beginning to sprout and take root. At the time Elliot was writing, themes of environmental destruction and the downfall of society were common amongst writers—it was just after World War I, after all. Still, writers wrote and gave voices to the masses. Moreover, what they wrote endures.

This spring we at ylvoice are thrilled to bring you Native peoples’ writing from our state that has taken root and is now ready to be enjoyed. This means links to reviews of new books and films, cultural events, and even some creative writing. Reading these words can help fortify artists and art aficionados that there are Native voices who are speaking both for and to them. We hope you’ll agree that these are voices worth listening to.

Now more than ever, we at ylvoice are looking for new works by Wisconsin’s First Nations’ citizens. If you or someone you know is interested in submitting, then please send us a note. Our strength is in amplifying voices. We hope that someday soon we’ll be able to amplify more.

For now, though, we hope you’ll enjoy the new pieces that are appearing monthly on our site. There’s some amazing work coming your way and you won’t want to miss it. Check back often and read about all the great pieces we’ve assembled. Like so many writers and publishers before, ylvoice is committed to producing work that endures.

In addition to being the acting editor of ylvoice, Ryan Winn writes a monthly column for the Tribal College Journal. Winn also teaches English, Theater, and Communication at College of Menominee Nation, where he has been recognized as the American Indian College Fund’s Faculty Member of the Year.

Winter Edition 2017

By Ryan Winn

Winter is the time for storytelling. There’s enough snow throughout the Badger State for the culture keepers amongst us to make the season memorable. As I look outside my window, I can’t help but think about one of the collections I’ve read from at nearly every writer’s workshop I’ve hosted. It’s the late Mohawk writer Maurice Kenny’s “Stories for a Winter’s Night.” As I realize it’s the perfect time to dive into its pages again, I wonder about how many workshop participants I recommended that collection to.

We at ylvoice are thrilled to recommend so many great books, films, and assorted media to anyone who will listen. This season, we’ll all focus our gaze on the pieces our readers can enjoy in the comfort of their own homes. Of course, we’ll always review local performances that spark the community’s interest.

As always, our site is a hub for Native writers to share their work with the world. As the ground remains frozen, we’ll provide some great pieces to help fortify our readers’ spirits. In this January 2017 issue, we have a review of the CMN theatre by Larry Madden and a review of the film, Seventh Fire, by Justin Gauthier.

Please help us spread the word about our publication, especially to Wisconsin Native American writers who have stories to tell. We’re always looking for new contributors. Wisconsin Natives’ voices deserve to be heard, and this is the season for writers to tell their stories.

In addition to being the acting editor of ylvoice, Ryan Winn writes a monthly column for the Tribal College Journal. Winn also teaches English, Theater, and Communication at College of Menominee Nation, where he has been recognized as the American Indian College Fund’s Faculty Member of the Year.

November Editor’s Notes

By Ryan Winn

It’s the month of gratitude — or at least the calm before the shopping season. Either way, ylvoice has some great work for you to feast your eyes upon while you enjoy our national day of overeating. Good food and good writing—what more could we ask for?

Justin Eagle Gauthier turned in a fine piece about The Magnificent Seven at The Skyway Drive-In Theater. The film was adequate, and Gauthier walks us through its history and shortcomings. Still, the Skyway is a Wisconsin gem, and his piece captures the ambiance of a cinema unlike any other. Even if a film doesn’t live up to expectations, it’s impossible to have a bad night at the Skyway.

Larry P. Madden reviewed The Arvid E. Miller Museum and Library, and he explains why the place is both a necessity for Mohican history and a treasure-trove for tourists to explore. The site is enthralling to experience first hand, and it’s a wonder how its curators are able to capture and display so much history in one modest building. Whether you’ve had the good fortune of visiting it or not, Madden’s piece will explain why it too is a Wisconsin treasure.

Rosemary Powless Malanik submitted two contemporary Native American poems: Friend and Me, that are fun plays on words. We are thrilled to publish them to help showcase that introspective writing doesn’t have to be epic to be impactful.

This month, we at ylvoice are grateful to all of you for stopping by our site. Please help us spread the word about our publication, especially to Wisconsin Native American writers who have stories to tell. Who knows, next year they might find their names amongst our list of celebrated contributors.

In addition to being the acting editor of ylvoice, Ryan Winn writes a monthly column for the Tribal College Journal. Winn also teaches English, Theater, and Communication at College of Menominee Nation, where he has been recognized as the American Indian College Fund’s Faculty Member of the Year.

 


October YL Editor’s Notes

By Ryan Winn

Autumn is upon us and that means crisp air and a myriad of colors throughout the Badger State. For those of us at "Yukhika-latuhse" and ylvoice.com.com, it also means that we’re focusing our critical eyes on a festive gathering for the outdoor lovers and a book and film review for those who would rather enjoy the season in indoor comfort.

Larry P. Madden reviewed “Models, Monsters, & Motors 7,” and he describes why an event that mixes hotrods, models, and Halloween cheer should be a part of your fall tradition. We especially like how he compares the beauty of the vehicles with that of an art gallery and explains how the models are quick to don the costumes and play the parts their evolving roles require.

In the indoor fair, we have Madden’s critique of the book “Bridge of Courage,” and Justin Eagle Gauthier’s thoughts on the film, “Hunt for the Wilderpeople.” Madden points us to a book that illuminates how the Mayan time of trauma continued as America celebrated its bicentennial. It’s both a heartbreaking and frustrating history to read. Gauthier points us to another film by a Maori master who keeps producing great performances from talented actors.

We also are thrilled to publish Melissa Goodbear’s poem “Urban Indian,” which we believe will resonate with those who’ve felt the scorn of discrimination. Still, the poem isn’t written by a victim—it’s a powerful explanation of how one Native woman won’t let anyone define who she is.

October is a great month to be a Wisconsinite. Our state comes alive with the hustle and bustle of seasonal change. We at ylvoice.com are thrilled you chose to spend some of your time with us during the exciting month we’re enjoying and we hope you’ll drop us an email to the editor, Ryan Winn, and let us know what you think about the words we’re delivering to your web browser.

In addition to being the acting editor of ylvoice.com, Ryan Winn writes a monthly column for the Tribal College Journal. Winn also teaches English, theater, and communication at College of Menominee Nation, where he has been recognized as the American Indian College Fund’s Faculty Member of the Year.


September 2016: Editor's Note

by Ryan Winn


It’s late summer in Northeast Wisconsin and that has us both enjoying the waning warm days and anticipating the cool ones to follow. This month, September, 2016, our reviewers have a nice mixture for your reading pleasure and ylvoice is always thrilled to be bringing their critiques to you.

The first two pieces celebrate modern Indigenous writing. Michelle “Kanatihal” Hill wrote about Bay Quarterer's wordpress poetry website, which resonates with contemporary readers much like printed books did with past generations. Michelle does a fine job capturing why its works are so potent, and based upon her recommendation we all should add the site to our bookmark tab. Larry P. Madden took in the Mohican Veteran’s Powwow and the history he provides about his people helps to explain why this event is celebrating its 40th year of honoring Native veterans.

Our next two reviews help remind us that the art of yesteryear can still resonate today. Justin Eagle Gauthier wrote about a 1975 made-for-TV movie titled, I Will Fight No More, Forever. Its title is a well-known quote from the real life version of its central character, Chief Joseph, and Gauthier explains why a forty year old film is worth streaming in our modern age.

Finally, Larry P. Madden wrote about a book published in 1990 titled, The Inupiat and Arctic Alaska: Ethnography of Development. The book chronicles what happens when petroleum is found on the lands of an otherwise ignored Native nation in the 1950s, but Madden sees it for what it is—a study of how colonialism spread in real-time over the four following decades. Stories such as these two need to be consumed. They paint pictures of recent history that shouldn’t be forgotten.

September is a beautiful time to be a Wisconsinite and we at ylvoice are thrilled you allowed us to be part of your artistic consumption. We hope you’ll spread the word about us and the important work we’re analyzing from throughout Indian Country.

In addition to being the acting editor of ylvoice, Ryan Winn writes a monthly column for the Tribal College Journal. Winn also teaches English, Theater, and Communication at College of Menominee Nation, where he has been recognized as the American Indian College Fund’s Faculty Member of the Year.


August 2016: Editor’s Note

By Ryan Winn

Mid-summer means it is Native theater season in northeast Wisconsin. Add in a music performance and a blockbuster film and you’ll have the gamut of media we reviewed this month.

Larry P. Madden took in both of College of Menominee Nation’s (CMN) theater productions for us, and, as the shows’ director, I was thrilled to see what he zeroed-in on. The first was CMN’s original show, Crisis at the Clinic, which speculated what would happen if contamination leached into Duck Creek. The show was well-received in Oneida and Madden wisely spoke about its merits alongside of what he sees as the larger impact of our performances. The second show was Gems of Yesteryear, which was a traditional Menominee Pageant staged in the Woodland Bowl. The show was a tribute to Menominee history and Madden discussed what it meant to revive an art form that hasn’t been produced in almost fifty years.

We also have two pieces on media that generated much buzz in our area. Christopher Johnson is a new voice to our site, but his work is well known to those who read Kalihwisaks. He was on-hand for Theresa “Bear” Fox’s Chautauqua Performance at the Oneida Community Education Center, and he wrote a great review of her show that explains why we should each check out this series of events.

Justin Eagle Gauthier unraveled the blockbuster film Suicide Squad and explains its successes and shortcomings. I like how Gauthier not only considered the film but also its place in the larger comic-based film universe that’s been storming our movie theaters. Adam Beach (Saulteaux) plays one of the marquee roles in the film, and that alone makes it worth notice.

It’s a great time to be enjoying and reviewing Native art. We’re thrilled you’re taking the time to hear what we have to say, and we hope that aspiring Native critics will send us their thoughts. We’re always looking for new voices to assess the wealth of Native art that demands to by analyzed.

In addition to being the acting editor of ylvoice, Ryan Winn writes a monthly column for the Tribal College Journal. Winn also teaches English, Theater, and Communication at College of Menominee Nation, where he has been recognized as the American Indian College Fund’s Faculty Member of the Year.


July 2016: Editors Note

By Ryan Winn

July is upon us and that means that powwow season is in full swing. As always, ylvoice is ready to talk about the events in our area, as well as a media production worth checking out.

This month we sent both of our seasoned critics to Oneida, WI, and I think you’ll be pleased with their commentary. Larry P. Madden (Mohican) took in the 2016 Oneida Pow-wow and captured the many reasons why it’s such a welcoming event year after year. The dancers, the drums, the gratitude, and the camaraderie stand out—and, of course, the food. Justin Eagle Gauthier (Menominee) went to the Woodland Indian Art Show, and he helped us evaluate both the art that was there and ponder which tribe’s art is missing. The show is in its tenth year, and, as much as that milestone should be celebrated, it’s amazing to look forward to the heights it will ascend to and the artists it will showcase in the years to come.

Madden also wrote about the short-lived SundanceTV series, The Red Road. The show may have only aired twelve episodes, but it showcased a plotline that will resonate with many Native viewers. The protagonist is a former felon trying to survive a post-incarceration life that’s filled with pitfalls and unresolved problems.The fictitious plot is bleak at times, but its unspoken focus is the ramifications of a tribe that lacks federal recognition. You should stream the series from Amazon and see what all the fuss is about.

Whether you’re looking for commentary on the events you love or the media you should consume, we’ve got you covered. If you’re a Native writer looking for a place to publish your media critiques, send us a query. Native art and cultural events deserve their just due, and who better to review them than Wisconsin’s Native writers.

In addition to being the acting editor of ylvoice, Ryan Winn writes a monthly column for the Tribal College Journal. Winn also teaches English, Theater, and Communication at College of Menominee Nation, where he has been recognized as the American Indian College Fund’s Faculty Member of the Year.


 

Editor’s Essay: Evolving into YLVOICE.COMcomputer screen

We at Yukhika-latuhse (she tells stories) had three problems to solve. The first was that our name, Yukhika-latuhse, is rarely pronounced correctly or spoken at all by those unsure of its phonetics. No one wanted us to drop the name that gave us eleven years of success, yet the problem over spreading the word about a journal whose name few could confidently pronounce was obvious. The second was that our annual print journal publication cycle wasn’t frequent enough to allow us to showcase the continuous creative output that makes us “Wisconsin’s Voice in Indigenous People's Arts and Culture.” The final one was that we needed to hire more writers to critique Native art and events to both celebrate their aesthetic achievements and engage with specific components of the work being produced.

This journal marks the beginning of our solutions. First, we are now simply named YL. From here on out we hope those two letters become synonymous with new Native art in our state, while still paying homage to the roots we spouted from. The second is that we will launch a new website that will publish fresh pieces electronically every few weeks. This will allow us to share the amazing work produced by our writers as soon as it’s submitted, and allow our readers to enjoy the journal throughout the year. Finally, we plan to publish at least two media or event reviews a month. Our goal is to foster a fluid dialogue between the artists who produce the work and the art aficionados who want to discuss why the pieces are vital. We will still publish an annual print issue with the most powerful work taken from our website, and so our evolution into an online presence won’t diminish what so many people love about our journal.

This 2015 issue is a mixture of the work we’ll always seek and three critical review pieces along the lines of what we’re now asking for. It has compelling fiction such as Jamie Komanekin’s humorous “For Tonto from the Lone Ranger”, and Taylor Oudenhoven’s apocalyptic thriller “The Smart Cell Sickness”. There are also two powerful poems from Richie Plass—“He Sings” and “Feather Changer”, as well as Beverly Rubio’s affirming “WE ARE” and Lloyd Frieson’s tribute to the great Charlie Hill, “A Man Called Charlie”. Plass, Rubio, and Komanekin also share their persuasive opinions in pieces on the air force, Christopher Columbus, and the goal of eliminating hunger, respectively. Finally, Justin Gauthier gives us an insightful film review of Up Heartbreak Hill, and Larry Madden uses his voice to illuminate both the novel Extra Indians and the potent “Brothertown Family Homecoming” event he participated in this past fall. We’re sure you’ll agree that this, our twelfth issue, is jam-packed with great writing.

The creative world is never stagnant. It’s always evolving to reflect the social and artistic visions of the time, and in that vein we’re thrilled to be able to continue to adapt into the journal our state’s Native writers and artists need.

Please check out our new site and help us spread the word about the new and improved YL.
--Ryan Winn

Ryan Winn teaches English, Theater, and Communication at College of Menominee Nation, where he has been recognized as the American Indian College Fund’s Faculty Member of the Year.